Reef Industries, Inc. is delighted to announce that November 2017 will mark the celebration of its 60th year in business. Founded in November 1957 by the late William D. Cameron, Reef Industries, Inc. was built on the foundation of being a reliable source of custom plastic laminate needs for our customers. Over the years, new technologies and innovations produced a variety of manufacturing techniques ultimately developing a wide range of products and material grades. With the introduction of these new product lines, the corporate identity of Reef Industries, Inc. was adopted in 1976. There is no time more fitting than now to thank our valued customers for their loyalty and support.
Typically a solitary animal, juvenile blacktip reef sharks will commonly conjugate in shallow regions during high tide. Vulnerable to larger predators, they will reside in shallower areas until larger in size. Blacktip reef sharks tend to be more active during dawn and dusk, but like most sharks they are opportunistic feeders. Their diet consists of crustaceans, squid, octopus, and bony fish.
Caribbean reef sharks are sometimes seen resting motionless on the sea floor or inside caves; it is the first active shark species in which such a behavior was reported. In 1975, Eugenie Clark investigated the famed "sleeping sharks" inside the caves at Isla Mujeres off the Yucatan Peninsula, and determined that the sharks were not actually asleep as their eyes would follow divers. Clark speculated that freshwater upwellings inside the caves might loosen parasites on the sharks and produce an enjoyable "narcotic" effect.[8] If threatened, Caribbean reef sharks sometimes perform a threat display, in which they swim in a short, jerky fashion with frequent changes in direction and repeated, brief (1–1.2 second duration) drops of the pectoral fins. This display is less pronounced than the better-known display of the grey reef shark (C. amblyrhynchos).[8][9]
Reef™ has the uncanny ability to mix fashion with beach life. Reef™ sandals and reef flip-flops are comfortable and supportive. One of their most popular sandals, the Reef™ J-Bay sandal, mixes recycled material with soft leather (with environmentally responsible production as opposed to toxic leather tanning) to give you comfort and a clean conscience. The Reef™ bikinis are flirty and cute with all the right ruffles, colors and tassels. Reef™ elevates its 2014 swimwear collection taking the Reef™ girl on a trip around the world. Its ‘Just Passing Through’ inspired line includes tribal prints, crochet pieces, and attention to detail. 2014 focuses on lush pink and blue water shades with tons of ethnic infused prints. Its extension of silhouettes goes from the traditional string bikini incorporating a basic solid color palette to the perfectly designed bralette for fashionable beach goer.
The Reef story started 25 years ago when two brothers from Argentina Fernando and Santiago Aguerre acted on an idea to produce high quality, comfortable yet stylish sandals. Inspired by their love of the California lifestyle and surfing culture, the brothers moved to California in the early 80's and found Reef sandals. With a tiny amount of start up capital of $4000 and after lots of hard work Reef is now widely considered to be the number one sandal brand in the world.
Corals, including some major extinct groups Rugosa and Tabulata, have been important reef builders through much of the Phanerozoic since the Ordovician Period. However, other organism groups, such as calcifying algae, especially members of the red algae Rhodophyta, and molluscs (especially the rudist bivalves during the Cretaceous Period) have created massive structures at various times. During the Cambrian Period, the conical or tubular skeletons of Archaeocyatha, an extinct group of uncertain affinities (possibly sponges), built reefs. Other groups, such as the Bryozoa have been important interstitial organisms, living between the framework builders. The corals which build reefs today, the Scleractinia, arose after the Permian–Triassic extinction event that wiped out the earlier rugose corals (as well as many other groups), and became increasingly important reef builders throughout the Mesozoic Era. They may have arisen from a rugose coral ancestor. Rugose corals built their skeletons of calcite and have a different symmetry from that of the scleractinian corals, whose skeletons are aragonite. However, there are some unusual examples of well-preserved aragonitic rugose corals in the late Permian. In addition, calcite has been reported in the initial post-larval calcification in a few scleractinian corals. Nevertheless, scleractinian corals (which arose in the middle Triassic) may have arisen from a non-calcifying ancestor independent of the rugosan corals (which disappeared in the late Permian).
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